Overtime I’m in the line at security at the airport, I despair at all the wasted time people spend in line.  What good does it do to have so many people just standing around?  It makes people grumpy and tired, and it just isn’t fun. It is also a security hazard:  having such a large concentration of people in an unsecured space regularly makes a tempting target for a would be terrorist.  It would totally be worth it for the TSA to hire more people and get people through security faster.  People would be happier.  The airport would be more secure.  Travel would be easier and more convenient.  People would waste less time doing something unproductive.

So, who is against this?

Every company that makes money from services that get you past the cesspit of the security line, that’s who.  CLEAR wouldn’t exist as a business if there was no line at security.  TSA PreCheck wouldn’t exist if there was no line at security.  The reason we have long lines at security is because Homeland Security is selling out our happiness so that a few people make some money.

So, to everyone who thinks that TSA PreCheck or CLEAR are the solution to the problem of waiting in line at airport security:  You have it backwards.  TSA PreCheck and CLEAR are the cause of waiting in line at airport security.  If you care about preventing our government’s slide into corruption, you should avoid the temptation of TSA PreCheck or CLEAR.

And on a larger scale, you might believe that the government would work better if it didn’t have premium levels of service for those who pay more.  How would you feel about premium membership in your local fire department?  You could subscribe to the “gold plan” of the fire department, and if theres ever a fire at your house or you need your cat rescued from a tree, you’ll get priority over someone else who didn’t sign up for the service.   Does that feel right?  Of course not.  

TSA PreCheck only exists because TSA has poor service.  The solution is to improve TSA’s service, not to give them money (i.e. bribes) to skip the line.

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